That’s the core message of #EachForEqual, the campaign at the centre of this year’s International Women’s Day. It seeks to draw attention to the idea that gender inequality isn’t a women’s issue, but an economic one – as gender equality is essential for economies and communities to thrive.

Business boardrooms, government departments and media coverage are just some of the key areas of focus highlighted by the campaign.

And by celebrating women’s achievement, raising awareness of bias and calling out inequality, the campaign says, we can all help to bring about change.

A symbol for change

The United Nations first celebrated International Women’s Day during International Women’s Year in 1975. By 1977, the UN and its member states proclaimed 8 March would be an official day for women’s rights and world peace. It’s now observed all over the world.

The #EachForEqual campaign has become a symbol of the movement, which extends far beyond 8 March, with activities running all year long. The idea is to reinforce and galvanize collective action, holding events and talks that urge us all to share responsibility and play our part.

“An equal world is an enabled world” – and every one of us can do our bit to bring about gender equality.